As I walk into my boss’ office, I am greeted with the click-clacking sounds of fingers dancing ferociously over computer keys and see a furrowed brow framing laser-focused eyes staring intently at the screen.

“Hey Becky, um sorry to bother you but…”

I am boarding the crowded DC train in the middle of rush hour and am carried aboard in a wave of frustrated and harried people. I drop my bag between my feet and reach up and grab the overhead bar to stabilize myself as I begin the long trek home.  Another passenger’s hand grazes mine.  Again, I say sorry.

I say sorry at least 15 times each day–whether I am at fault or not. It has become a staple in my vocabulary.

To all my chronic over apologizers–why do we do that?

One common theory, which fairly accurately explains my overuse of the word “sorry,” is that being perceived as rude is so abhorrent–especially to women— that we need to make ourselves less obtrusive before we speak up. We also say sorry to display humility and as a way to avoid or quickly end conflict.

Here are some reasons we should rethink when, why and how we say sorry and possibly strike it from our vocabulary altogether: read more.

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